Connect with us

Blockchain

“Institutions have Arrived:” Who, What, and Why

Reading Time: 7 minutes 2019 is the year we can finally say “institutions have arrived,” in the blockchain / crypto industry and in a big way. Despite being a commonly cited catalyst within the crypto space, progress has felt slow. After all, these are large organizations with significant value at risk, so they want to be careful and deliberate […]

The post “Institutions have Arrived:” Who, What, and Why appeared first on BlockchainCapital.

Republished by Plato

Published

on

Reading Time: 7 minutes

2019 is the year we can finally say “institutions have arrived,” in the blockchain / crypto industry and in a big way. Despite being a commonly cited catalyst within the crypto space, progress has felt slow. After all, these are large organizations with significant value at risk, so they want to be careful and deliberate about embracing new innovations and opportunities. We’ve finally seen real momentum from legacy tech and financial institutions — with Square, Microsoft, Fidelity, and Facebook all announcing their forays into this space. Two years after the last crypto bull market, it is undeniable that institutions and enterprises have arrived. But why now? What does this mean for the future?

“We’ve got blockchain”

At a high level, institutions are looking to get into blockchain for a few reasons: research and development, growth opportunities, and in many cases, FOMO. For many, they are conducting research and development to understand the technology and gain a perspective on the landscape at large. As more companies decide to experiment in the space, the competitive pressures increase dramatically as institutions seek to capture early growth and revenue opportunities and fend off disruptive risk. In addition, innovation within large corporations is an important component of talent retention as more talent is leaving their Wall Street and tech roles for crypto startups.

We are also witnessing a large, generational demographic shift in financial services. Financial institutions are currently serving aging customer populations, and in many cases struggling to capture the minds and wallet share of the younger, more tech savvy customers. In an effort to understand these demographics, cryptoassets are a trend to watch. There is major FOMO — no one wants to “miss the boat” on what could be a massive growth opportunity or ignore what could potentially present existential risk to their business model. This has led to both thoughtful analysis of the space and what some call “innovation theater “— a proof of concept for the sake of “doing blockchain” with little practical utility. As more institutions embrace the space, it results in a net positive for the industry. But the details matter as we move out of the pilot and POC phase to serious implementations, products, and services. And, as an industry it is important to encourage use cases that utilize the technology optimally rather than simply instituted a new internal database.

Who are these institutions?

The term institution is overly broad — in reality, we are seeing many types of companies enter the space. For the sake of simplicity, the table below categorizes primarily U.S. institutions and enterprises. It is not meant to be comprehensive, but more representative.

While we have an extensive list of players entering the space, they can’t be treated equally. Rather, the implications will either be far reaching or stay siloed as “innovation projects” within these organizations. In order to understand potential outcomes, we consider their existing customer base, market trends they face and risk tolerance. Lastly, an important component which is largely outside of the public purview, comes down to the talent inside these organizations and how they shape the internal views of the space.


Asset Allocators
Who: Fund of funds, family offices, endowments, pension plans
What: venture fund, hedge fund, and direct investments
Examples: Stanford, MIT, Princeton

As crypto assets emerge as a new asset class, asset allocators have been forced to wrap their minds around the technology and space at large. Cambridge Associates recently published their report “Venture into the Unknown” where they evaluate crypto allocation strategies and recommend investors consider an allocation to digital assets. Their suggestion stems from the belief that blockchain investing can be likened to early internet investing, fraught with young, risky technologies that may end up spurring the next wave of capital inflows.

From the perspective of an asset allocator, exposure to the industry is beginning to play an important diversification role for their portfolio strategy. Considerations include what type of investment fits into their strategy (e.g., venture vs. hedge), which types of managers to invest in (emerging specialist or tenured generalist), and the liquidity profile of the asset class (greater liquidity with tokens but no IPOs to date given industry nascence).

Since the 2017 bull run, over $1B of dedicated crypto venture and hedge funds have been raised (Blockchain Capital $150M, A16z @$300M, Paradigm @$400M, Dragonfly $100M and more) with institutional participation. Asset allocation is an important indicator of market growth and the rate of capital formation in any new industry.

Traditional Financial Institutions
Who: custodians, exchanges, brokerage providers, asset managers, and banks
What: trade and execution services, custody, OTC desks
Examples: Fidelity, ICE (Bakkt), JPMorgan, DRW

Traditional financial institutions are cautiously watching the space, some with disregard while others leaned into the space. It wasn’t until recently many realized cryptoassets could pose both a serious threat and opportunity for their existing businesses. Regardless of their position, it became a strategic watch area inside virtually every financial services institution. Historically, financial services has been slow to respond to digitization that is prevalent in other industries. However, fintech is already eating at their products and pricing strategies with the rise of online robo-advisors and digital banking. These institutions are all facing similar trends: an aging investor base, fee compression across all products and services, decreased brand allegiance with millennials, largely outdated infrastructure, and of course, increased customer demand for more crypto education and access. From their strategic agenda, institutions are constantly looking for opportunities to diversify revenue streams with large growth markets and higher margin products. The balance here comes into play with risk tolerance and their ability to make decisions quickly and adapt to the market with their existing infrastructure.

At Matt Walsh noted — the best institutions will cut through innovation theater and really try to understand how they can leverage the technology. On one end we have Fidelity who is diving in deep to understand the entire ecosystem (mining, trade execution, custody, etc.) and have taken steps to offer custody and eventually execution services. On the other end of the spectrum JPMorgan’s enterprise coin is more conservative, by creating a proof-of-concept internal tool, rather than a revenue generating or customer facing product. While still a net positive for understanding and awareness, I’m paying closer attention to the Fidelity’s of the world.

Fintech
Who: technology focused, financial services providers
What: brokerage services, portfolio management
Examples: Robinhood, Square, SoFi

Fintech aligns well with crypto — both having a shared goal of using technology to reach underbanked or hard to access populations, with cheaper and accessible products. There is also a demographic overlap with younger, tech-savvy, less financially wealthy consumers. This backdrop coupled with nimbler operations and an updated tech infrastructure makes fintech players extremely well poised to capture crypto interest. Initially we are seeing brokerage products like Robinhood and POS systems like Square make the first leaps into the space — indeed, Square’s latest annual earnings report show they did $166M in revenue from bitcoin in 2019, with a net profit of $1.69M. The motivations here are less about disruption, and more focused on how they can use the technology and assets to spur new growth and address customer demand. 

Payment companies
Who: credit cards companies, payment processors, remittance services
What: strategic investments via venture capital and partnerships
Examples: VISA, PayPal

Payments or becoming a “medium of exchange” is one of the original use cases for cryptoassets. Over time, we’ve realized that the payment rails for most of the developed world actually work incredibly well, and may not benefit from introducing crypto for a few reasons. The most commonly cited is the traditional scale question, with blockchains unable to handle the scale of millions of transactions that Visa processes. However, more importantly, the additional friction of going from fiat to crypto, and then converting again at the other side of a cross-border remittance (dubbed the “last mile problem”) largely outweighs any value derived from processing payments with crypto today. The scenario where this starts to make more sense, is when people are holding the digital assets alone and able to transact with them more freely.

At this point, one major question for payment companies to consider is how a macro trend in holding and transacting with digital assets may impact their business model. In other words, how are their existing customers going to use digital assets in the future and what impact will this have on their market. A few scenarios include a world where consumers use multiple digital wallets regularly, conduct commerce in both fiat and crypto, or choose to self-custody some or all of their digital assets. Until now, payment companies have been slower to respond to the potential of crypto. But it would not be surprising if many significantly increase their engagement in efforts to identify the appropriate opportunities as these macro trends accelerate.

Social Media
Who: messaging applications, social networks
What: wallet infrastructure, tokens
Examples: Facebook Libra, Telegram, Kakao

The overlap of social media and cryptoassets is one of the most interesting trends to watch today. There are two ways to consider this — coming from a crypto perspective and then from within social media platforms. On the crypto side, social media adoption of digital assets has the potential to massively open up distribution channels around the world. This has implications for onboarding new users, building out infrastructure, and spreading acceptance and awareness. Facebook’s Libra is not viewed as competitive to bitcoin, but rather a gateway to more users adopting bitcoin.

The second angle, is how digital asset adoption will change social media business models. Social media platforms are moving from sharing user-generated information to offering user-generated products and services. Instagram already made this leap with thousands of influencers building social media based businesses and their newest payment feature for shopping in-app. With Libra, Facebook is making a strong move into financial services to complement their massive adtech business. Similar to the way direct messaging or “DM-ing” competes with email for millennials, will social media digital wallets compete with the brokerages and banks of the world?

On the other hand, social media giants represent what crypto evangelists are trying to fight against (i.e., centralized monopolies). Centralized powers with unequal access to consumer data and privacy controls. Therefore, the way in which social media companies embrace crypto will be important. If successful, it could shift their models from centralized powers to open platforms with greater privacy protection for its users.

Software Enterprises
Who: SaaS, infrastructure
What: enterprise blockchains, supply chain use cases, identity
Examples: Microsoft, Salesforce, IBM, Amazon

Software enterprises have historically fallen into the innovation theater category. From their perspective they are trying to understand how public vs. private blockchains could be useful for their business models. In many cases this has led to private blockchain proof-of-concepts and not much more. However, there is a great deal of pressure to address the space (along with other technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning) as a way to stay competitive and relevant. One of the better examples we have seen comes from Microsoft with the announced their decentralized identity tool building on bitcoin. Hopefully the industry will see initiatives like this geared at working with the open source community and understanding applications of public protocols rather than closed private implementations.

Where do we go from here?

We have major categories of institutions entering into the space, each with their own angle and value proposition. The industry has seen well over $1B of capital allocation to dedicated crypto funds, which will spur the next wave of startups and capital formation in the space. As more institutions enter we will see increased liquidity and onramps, massive distribution channels, and utility focused products & services. Perhaps most importantly, the professionals inside of these organizations will be forced to understand the space, debate its merits and learn. This will allow blockchain and crypto to move from a buzzword and proof-of-concept phase, to becoming truly understood and incorporated into strategic product roadmaps. The space is slowly moving into the mainstream, and with projects like Libra, it’s about to see a lot more institutional participation.

Thank you to Spencer BogartDerek HsueAleks Larsen for helpful feedback.

Source: https://blockchain.capital/institutions-have-arrived-who-what-and-why/

Blockchain

This bullish Bitcoin options strategy lets traders speculate on BTC price with less risk

Republished by Plato

Published

on

Historical data shows that it is nearly impossible to consistently predict Bitcoin’s price action and many traders that attempt this end up losing money. Now that Bitcoin trades near $50,000, the ultimate goal for most traders is to hold on to their current holdings and incrementally add to them in a way that is not terribly risky. 

Options strategies provide excellent opportunities for traders who have a fixed-range target for an asset. For example, using leveraged futures contracts might be a solution for a scenario where one expects a price increase of up to 28% over the next month. Of course, using a tight stop loss lessens the viability of the trade.

On the other hand, using multiple call (buy) options can create a strategy that allows gains that are four times higher than the potential loss. These can be used in both bullish and bearish circumstances, depending on the investors’ expectations.

The long butterfly strategy allows a trader to profit from the upside while limiting losses. It’s important to remember that options have a set expiry date; therefore, the price increase must happen during the defined period.

The Bitcoin (BTC) calendar options below are for the March 26 expiry, but this strategy can also be used on Ether (ETH) options or a different time frame. Although the costs will vary, its general efficiency should not be affected.

Profit / Loss estimate. Source: Deribit Position Builder

The suggested bullish strategy consists of buying 1 BTC worth $48,000 call options while simultaneously selling double that amount of $56,000 calls. To finalize the trade, one should buy 1 BTC worth of $64,000 call options.

While this call option gives the buyer the right to acquire an asset, the contract seller gets a (potential) negative exposure.

As the estimate above shows, if BTC is trading for $48,700, any outcome between $49,380 (up 1.5%) and $62,630 (up 28.6%) yields a net gain. For example, a 10% price increase to $53,570 results in a $4,000 net gain. Meanwhile, this strategy’s maximum loss is $1,350 if BTC trades below $48,000 or above $64,000 on March 26.

This allure of this butterfly strategy is the trader can secure a $4,050 gain, which is 3x larger than the maximum loss, if BTC trades from $53,550 to $58,460 expiry.

Overall it yields a much better risk-reward from leveraged futures trading considering the limited downside.

The multiple options strategy trade provides a better risk-reward for bullish traders seeking exposure to BTC’s price increase and the only upfront fee required is the $1,350 which reflects the maximum loss if the price is below $48,000 or above $64,000 at the expiry date.

The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Cointelegraph. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision.

Source: https://cointelegraph.com/news/this-bullish-bitcoin-options-strategy-lets-traders-speculate-on-btc-price-with-less-risk

Continue Reading

Blockchain

Transaction batching protocol Furucombo suffers $14 million “evil contract” hack

Republished by Plato

Published

on

The latest “evil contract” exploit has netted an attacker over $14 million in stolen funds. 

Furucombo, a tool designed to help users “batch” transactions and interactions with multiple protocols at once, fell victim to the attack which centered on token approvals from users.

The attacker’s address currently has $14 million worth of various cryptocurrencies, but the attack appears to be larger as they have been transferring ETH to privacy mixer Tornado Cash in batches over the last hour.

This attack is conceptually similar to the $20 million “evil jar” attack that struck Pickle Finance last year, as well as the $37 million “evil spell” exploit that hit Alpha Finance earlier this month. In these “evil contract” exploits, an attacker creates a contract that fools a protocol into believing it belongs there, giving them access to protocol funds.

In this case, the attacker ‘tricked’ the Furucombo protocol into thinking that their contract was a new verison of Aave. From there, instead of draining funds from the protocol as in previous evil contract exploits, the attacker instead leveraged the ability to transfer the funds of every user who had given the protocol token permissions. 

“Infinite permissions means you can wipe everyone who interacted with Furucombo,” said whitehat hacker and co-founder of DeFi Italy Emiliano Bonassi in a statement to Cointelegraph.

This type of exploit appears to be growing increasingly popular, now accounting for over $70 million in user funds lost in just a few months.

The team confirmed the attack in a Tweet, saying that they “believed” they’d mitigated the exploit but recommended revoking permissions “out of an abundance of caution:”

Users can leverage tools like revoke.cash to do so. 

The attack comes during a period of wider reflection in the DeFi world on security and the utility of auditing companies. In the last three months, three different auditing and code review services have emerged, each with a different incentive model designed to encourage more thorough and dynamic security practices.

Source: https://cointelegraph.com/news/transaction-batching-protocol-furucombo-suffers-14-million-evil-contract-hack

Continue Reading

Blockchain

The current Bitcoin bull run is different; here’s why!

Republished by Plato

Published

on

Bitcoin’s price has gone past multiple ATHs over the past two months, with its ATH of $58,640 being the latest one. However, the last 7 days haven’t been the best of times for the world’s largest cryptocurrency, with its price dropping to $45k before recovering to trade around the $47.5k-range at press time. While Bitcoin’s price aspirations in the long term remain unquestionable, are investors confident of the asset in the short-term is a relevant question to ask yourself given the current market sentiment.

In an earlier article, it was observed that an emerging trend that has become all the more evident this market cycle involves the key role BTC whales are playing in determining the market’s direction. The data analyzed highlighted how over 100 whale accounts exited the BTC market over the past few weeks after the price climbed to its ATH, before correcting as a result of the sellers in the market.

This was further backed up by Glassnode after its data highlighted how the Bitcoin supply held by large addresses with a BTC balance ranging from 1k – 10k has dipped.

Source: Glassnode

However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that large accounts including institutions are now losing confidence in BTC and are now entering the seller’s market. On the contrary, this is characteristic of Bitcoin’s market cycle. This was evidenced by long-term holder sentiment since it portrays a better and clearer picture of what BTC’s prospects look like in the long run. A way to determine this includes looking at how much confidence investors have in the BTC market.

Source: Glassnode

Taking a look at Glassnode’s market data on Hodler net position change can serve as a good way to understand the coin’s long-term prospects. According to the same, confidence in the continuation of the Bitcoin bull market, despite the current pullback, is quite high, even when compared to previous price corrections in January 2021.

The negative values on the chart indicate hodlers cashing out and taking profits when the price of BTC falls. In January for instance, the altcoin fell to a low of around $30k, with Glassnode observing that a high percentage of hodlers were more inclined to sell at that price range.

When comparing the said data to the present price correction, it can be observed that the position change, while still negative, is quite negligible, implying that a significant number of long-term hodlers are continuing to back the coin, increasing the likelihood of a recovery run in the short-term.

Source: Glassnode

Additionally, the amount of illiquid Bitcoin supply on the network has grown more than the circulating supply since 2017 by a significant margin. When coupled with the hike in demand from institutions over the past 10 months, the shortage is going to work in favour of the coin and boost its price.

When talking about Bitcoin’s price, it is often compared to the momentum it enjoyed back in 2017. After all, this was the Bitcoin bull run that put it in the spotlight. However, the aforementioned metrics also highlight why this bull cycle is not as short-lived as the 2017 bull run and why the bears have been largely out of the picture, unlike in the months that followed December 2017.


Sign Up For Our Newsletter


Source: https://ambcrypto.com/the-current-bitcoin-bull-run-is-different-heres-why

Continue Reading
Blockchain5 days ago

Peter Schiff Now Discusses Bitcoin More Often Than His Beloved Gold

Blockchain2 days ago

Gemini collaborates with The Giving Block and others, adds donations option

Blockchain4 days ago

Optimized Ethereum Mining Settings for Nvidia RTX 3060 Ti, RTX 3070, RTX 3080 and RTX 3090 GPUs

Blockchain2 days ago

NextGen Blockchain Platforms Self-Organize to Win Government Contracts

Blockchain4 days ago

Bitcoin falls to $45K in sequel to 20% BTC price crash

Blockchain5 days ago

New report predicts NFTs will explode in popularity during 2021

Blockchain5 days ago

Kraken users demand refunds over flash-crash liquidations

Blockchain4 days ago

Elon Musk Reacts to Tesla Losing $15 Billion After Investing in Bitcoin

Blockchain5 days ago

$24 million lost in second-largest day of DeFi liquidations

Blockchain5 days ago

Altcoins and DeFi sell-off after Bitcoin’s 17.6% correction below $50K

Blockchain5 days ago

Crypto influencer warns Ethereum fees will drive users away

Blockchain4 days ago

XRP, Basic Attention Token, Compound Price Analysis: 23 February

Blockchain3 days ago

Traditional Banks get serious about enabling crypto-related services

Blockchain4 days ago

Bitcoin Still Correcting

Blockchain4 days ago

Kraken Reacts to Market Selloff

Blockchain5 days ago

Price analysis 2/22: BTC, ETH, BNB, DOT, ADA, XRP, LTC, LINK, BCH, XLM

Blockchain4 days ago

Coinbase Whale Accumulation Could Prevent Bitcoin Dropping Below $44K

Blockchain3 days ago

Trailing Take Profit Explained

Blockchain3 days ago

Crypto Lending Explained 2021

Blockchain2 days ago

What Coinbase Going Public Could Do For Crypto

Trending